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Welcome to Our NGO REFORMS FOR India

India, officially the Republic of India, is a country in South Asia. It is the seventh-largest country by area, the second-most populous country with over 1.2 billion people, and the most populous democracy in the world.

Tourism in India is the largest service industry with a contribution of 6.23% to the national GDP and 8.78% of the total employment in India. In 2010, total Foreign Tourist Arrivals (FTA) in India were 5.78 million and India generated about 200 billion US dollars in 2008 and that is expected to increase to US$375.5 billion by 2018 at a 9.4% annual growth rate. The majority of foreign tourists come from USA and UK. Kerala, Tamil Nadu, Delhi, Uttar Pradesh and Rajasthan are the top five states to receive inbound tourists. Domestic tourism in the same year was 740 million. Andhra Pradesh, Uttar Pradesh, Tamil Nadu and Maharashtra received the big share of these visitors. Ministry of Tourism is the nodal agency to formulate national policies and programmes for the development and promotion of tourism. In the process, the Ministry consults and collaborates with other stakeholders in the sector including various Central Ministries/agencies, the state governments and union territories and the representatives of the private sector. Concerted efforts are being made to promote new forms of tourism such as rural, cruise, medical and eco-tourism. The Ministry of Tourism also maintains the Incredible India campaign.

  • Fund Raising
  • Child Adoption
  • Group Work
  • Tree Plantation
  • Childhood Care
  • Build Orphanage

Become Volenteer

Alleppey Beach, also known as Alappuzha Beach is one of the most visited beaches of Kerala. To the west of the beach lies the Arabian Sea and along with it a large network of lakes, lagoons and several freshwater rivers located nearby. In addition, this beach is also known to be the busiest coast of entire Kerala. Moreover, the canals and the backwaters of this beach make possible the business of tea and rubber throughout. This beach also houses a lighthouse which is 1,000 ft in height. Built by Captain Hugh Crawford in 1862, this lighthouse was to assist and help boats arriving on this beach for trade purpose. At present, tourists visiting this beach can witness the reminiscence of the lighthouse.Due to the dilapidated structure of the lighthouse, the government has prohibited entry inside the lighthouse. Much of the portions of the lighthouse have been washed by the waves and bricks that have been carried away by the sea water.

Reduced World Poverty

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Funding the Poor

Courtallam Falls is what I believe this waterfall is called though it also seems like it’s called the Main Falls. Even though Julie and I thought this was one of the more memorable waterfalling experiences we’ve ever had (in more ways than just the aesthetics; read further below), I was a bit confused as to how it was named because the Main Falls is one of the cluster of nine waterfalls collectively known as the Courtallam Falls as they’re all near the town of Courtallam (pronounced “kor-TAH-lum”), and they all apparently have Ayurvedic healing properties as their feeding streams pass through groves of naturally growing herbs. From what I could tell, the individual waterfalls of Courtallam were: Main Falls , Old Falls, Five Falls, Shenbagadevi Falls, Honey Falls, Tiger Falls, Small Falls, Fruit Garden Falls, and Palaruvi Falls or Milk Falls (which was across the state border in Kerala). Regarding the Ayurvedic healing properties, I’ve seen instances where some doctors even recommend or prescribe bathing in these falls. Since India is well-known for producing doctors, maybe they’re onto something. Since they allow public bathing beneath the healing properties of the waterfall, I’ve seen the Courtallam Falls also referred to as the Spa of India. In addition to changing rooms, they’ve also designated a ladies only and gentlemen only section. The ladies were on the far right side of the falls while the males were on the left side. A small stone arch bridge segregated the two sides beneath the falls though we didn’t see anyone cross that bridge (access to the ladies side was via a walkway opposite the stream and plunge pool to the right of the bridge over the stream). Of all of the Ayurvedic waterfalls, the Main Falls was probably the most impressive one as far as we were concerned. It was certainly by far the widest and probably the tallest of the waterfalls (at least 30- to 40m Height) in the Courtallam area. And due to its relative grandeur, we also thought this was the most popular waterfall in the vicinity as evidenced by the mass of humanity we saw in and around the falls. There was even a very large, busy, loud, and crowded, yet atmospheric marketplace fronting the bathing area. Embedded in this chaos apparently was a long Hindu temple (which might have been the source of the loud music we were hearing). Where else but India could you mix a waterfall with a marketplace, religious center, and happening social scene? Even though this was a very busy waterfall, I don’t think foreigners come here or even know a whole lot about it. The reason why we say this was because Julie and I were the only non-Indians during our visit. And it seemed as if we drew stares from the tens of thousands of people that were present regardless of whether we were walking through the marketplace or experiencing the waterfall itself. When we were busy trying to photograph Courtallam Falls and to enjoy the scene, we were suddenly inundated with a large group of at least a couple dozen people curious about what we were doing. Some people even took photographs of us like the way paparazzi would take photos of celebrities (another indication that I guess we really stood out from the crowd since we were racially different). I can’t say being the center of attention of so many people was a very comforting feeling, but it was definitely an adventure and learning experience to say the least. I’ve also seen the spelling of Courtallam as Kuttralam, Kutralam, Kutrallam, as well as Courtralam among others. This was probably due to the inexact science of mapping from the local pronunciations (not sure if its name was Hindi or Tamil or some other local dialect) into English. We were told by our Keralan driver that we happened to be here when devout Hindu males had just begun fasting for 40 days, and many of them liked to bathe at Courtallam Falls or one of the other Ayurvedic waterfalls in the area perhaps to wash away impurities or something like that. I didn’t quite get what happened after the 40 days, but I thought he mentioned that these guys would then become worthy enough to make a pilgrimage into some temple in the hills (note sure whether he meant in the Indian Himalayas or in Nepal or just some local place nearby) to pray. Visitors to this place like to have bath in these falls from dawn to dusk. One can have bath at anytime in a day and one would not get sneezing or cold as the water is said to possess medicinal qualities of the herbal plants grown in this mountain. Those suffering from rheumatic joints, chronic headache, nerve disorder get cured by a lengthy stay at Courtallam.

Shelter for Poor

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Our Causes

Fund for Poverty

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Raised:$8500 | Goal:$10000 | Duration:8 M

Fund for Extra Activities

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Raised:$750 | Goal:$2000 | Duration:2 M

Fund for Refugee

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Raised:$8500 | Goal:$10000 | Duration:6 M

Fund for Poverty

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Raised:$8500 | Goal:$10000 | Duration:8 M

Fund for Home

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Raised:$8500 | Goal:$20000 | Duration:1 Y

Fund for Education

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Raised:$1500 | Goal:$25000 | Duration:5 M

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Our Hardworking Volunteers

Roger Peter

Joined 18th October 2015

Rose Davidson

Joined 15th August 2012

Hubert Austin

Joined 22nd November 2016

Clara Stanley

Joined 10th January 2017

Kaylana Lake

Kaylana Lake in Jodhpur, Rajasthan is located 8 kms to the west of Jodhpur on the Jaiselmer road. Pratap Singh, the then Prime Minister of Jodhpur, got the lake constructed in 1872. This artificial lake is spread over 84 square kms. Where the lake now lies, was once an area having palaces and gardens of two rulers of Jodhpur. They were destroyed to make the Kaylana Lake. Near to the lake is a Dak Bungalow of PHED, the Irrigation department. There are also boating facilities available for the tourists here.

An ideal picnic spot for tourists, this lake offers a breathtaking view of the sunset. At that time the sky looks like a canvas splashed with spectacular colors. Kaylana Lake is the perfect place to relax or have picnics. If you are interested in birds, then, this place will further interest you. Also known by the name of Pratap Sagar, the area around this lake was once full of wild bears. It served as a secured hunting place for the royal members. But, with the increase in population it has not remained so.

Don’t even try to swim in this if you are not an expert swimmer. Better still, don’t swim at all. Many youngsters trying to swim across this deep lake have lost their lives. Inspite of this, Kaylana Lake is a charming picnic spot. The beauty of this place will keep on lingering with you for a long time after your visit.

John Smith

Donated: $700

Marya Simmons

Donated: $200

Mark Pine

Donated: $250

Emma Nelson

Donated: $600

Kelvin Walters

Donated: $500

Jerin Smith

Donated: $500